Welcome



Welcome to the Computer Graphics Group at RWTH Aachen University!

The research and teaching activities at our institute focus on geometry acquisition and processing, on interactive visualization, and on related areas such as computer vision, photo-realistic image synthesis, and ultra high speed multimedia data transmission.

In our projects we are cooperating with various industry companies as well as with academic research groups around the world. Results are published and presented at high-profile conferences and symposia. Additional funding sources, among others, are the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the European Union.

Geometry Lab Exhibition

On November 3–5 we will be staging the Geometry Lab: an event where works of art meet scientific exhibits. Located in the Ludwig Forum art gallery, the exhibition displays an entire spectrum from classical geometric phenomena to modern research areas. In addition, workshops will be held for participants to fold paper into fascinating forms, build complex structures with Zometool, or even assemble their very own 3D printer.

Sept. 20, 2017

We will be hosting the International Conference on Geometric Modeling and Processing (GMP) in April 2018.

June 19, 2017

We have a paper on Variance-Minimizing Transport Plans for Inter-surface Mapping at SIGGRAPH 2017.

May 2, 2017

We have a paper on City Reconstruction and Visualization from Public Data Sources at the Eurographics Workshop on Urban Data Modelling and Visualisation 2016.

Nov. 8, 2016

We have a paper on the Geodesic Iso-Curve Signature at the 21st International Symposium on Vision, Modeling and Visualization.

Sept. 9, 2016

We have a paper on interactive quad meshing at SIGGRAPH Asia 2016.

Sept. 6, 2016

Recent Publications

Fluid Sketching — Immersive Sketching Based on Fluid Flow

Proceedings of IEEE Virtual Reality Conference 2018

Fluid artwork refers to works of art based on the aesthetics of fluid motion, such as smoke photography, ink injection into water, and paper marbling. Inspired by such types of art, we created Fluid Sketching as a novel medium for creating 3D fluid artwork in immersive virtual environments. It allows artists to draw 3D fluid-like sketches and manipulate them via six degrees of freedom input devices. Different sets of brush strokes are available, varying different characteristics of the fluid. Because of fluid's nature, the diffusion of the drawn fluid sketch is animated, and artists have control over altering the fluid properties and stopping the diffusion process whenever they are satisfied with the current result. Furthermore, they can shape the drawn sketch by directly interacting with it, either with their hand or by blowing into the fluid. We rely on particle advection via curl-noise as a fast procedural method for animating the fluid flow.

 

You Spin my Head Right Round: Threshold of Limited Immersion for Rotation Gains in Redirected Walking

IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics

In virtual environments, the space that can be explored by real walking is limited by the size of the tracked area. To enable unimpeded walking through large virtual spaces in small real-world surroundings, redirection techniques are used. These unnoticeably manipulate the user’s virtual walking trajectory. It is important to know how strongly such techniques can be applied without the user noticing the manipulation—or getting cybersick. Previously, this was estimated by measuring a detection threshold (DT) in highly-controlled psychophysical studies, which experimentally isolate the effect but do not aim for perceived immersion in the context of VR applications. While these studies suggest that only relatively low degrees of manipulation are tolerable, we claim that, besides establishing detection thresholds, it is important to know when the user’s immersion breaks. We hypothesize that the degree of unnoticed manipulation is significantly different from the detection threshold when the user is immersed in a task. We conducted three studies: a) to devise an experimental paradigm to measure the threshold of limited immersion (TLI), b) to measure the TLI for slowly decreasing and increasing rotation gains, and c) to establish a baseline of cybersickness for our experimental setup. For rotation gains greater than 1.0, we found that immersion breaks quite late after the gain is detectable. However, for gains lesser than 1.0, some users reported a break of immersion even before established detection thresholds were reached. Apparently, the developed metric measures an additional quality of user experience. This article contributes to the development of effective spatial compression methods by utilizing the break of immersion as a benchmark for redirection techniques.

 

Directional Field Synthesis, Design, and Processing

SIGGRAPH '17 Courses, July 30 - August 03, 2017, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Direction fields and vector fields play an increasingly important role in computer graphics and geometry processing. The synthesis of directional fields on surfaces, or other spatial domains, is a fundamental step in numerous applications, such as mesh generation, deformation, texture mapping, and many more. The wide range of applications resulted in definitions for many types of directional fields: from vector and tensor fields, over line and cross fields, to frame and vector-set fields. Depending on the application at hand, researchers have used various notions of objectives and constraints to synthesize such fields. These notions are defined in terms of fairness, feature alignment, symmetry, or field topology, to mention just a few. To facilitate these objectives, various representations, discretizations, and optimization strategies have been developed. These choices come with varying strengths and weaknesses. This course provides a systematic overview of directional field synthesis for graphics applications, the challenges it poses, and the methods developed in recent years to address these challenges.

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