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Patric Schmitz, M.Sc.
Room 109
Phone: +49 241 8021805
Fax: +49 241 8022899
Email: patric.schmitz@cs.rwth-aachen.de



Presentations


Event

Type

Title

Thrill of Deception.
From Ancient Art to Virtual Reality
Ludwig Forum Aachen 2019   
Demo    Virtual Walk Through the Aachen Cathedral
Mensch und Computer 2018    Demo    Real Walking in Virtual Spaces:
Visiting the Aachen Cathedral
IEEE VR Conference 2018    Paper    You Spin my Head Right Round: Threshold of Limited Immersion for Rotation Gains in Redirected Walking
VR in Industry Conference 2017    Talk    Valuable Assistance in Immersive Virtual Environments: Virtual Agents and Redirected Walking
ICT Projekthaus Workshop 2017    Talk    Getting Around in Cyberspace:
The Perception of Space in Virtual Reality


Publications


High-Fidelity Point-Based Rendering of Large-Scale 3D Scan Datasets


Patric Schmitz, Timothy Blut, Christian Mattes, Leif Kobbelt
IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications
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Digitalization of 3D objects and scenes using modern depth sensors and high-resolution RGB cameras enables the preservation of human cultural artifacts at an unprecedented level of detail. Interactive visualization of these large datasets, however, is challenging without degradation in visual fidelity. A common solution is to fit the dataset into available video memory by downsampling and compression. The achievable reproduction accuracy is thereby limited for interactive scenarios, such as immersive exploration in Virtual Reality (VR). This degradation in visual realism ultimately hinders the effective communication of human cultural knowledge. This article presents a method to render 3D scan datasets with minimal loss of visual fidelity. A point-based rendering approach visualizes scan data as a dense splat cloud. For improved surface approximation of thin and sparsely sampled objects, we propose oriented 3D ellipsoids as rendering primitives. To render massive texture datasets, we present a virtual texturing system that dynamically loads required image data. It is paired with a single-pass page prediction method that minimizes visible texturing artifacts. Our system renders a challenging dataset in the order of 70 million points and a texture size of 1.2 terabytes consistently at 90 frames per second in stereoscopic VR.

» Show Videos



A Three-Level Approach to Texture Mapping and Synthesis on 3D Surfaces


Kersten Schuster, Philip Trettner, Patric Schmitz, Leif Kobbelt
Proceedings of the ACM on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques, Vol. 3, No. 1, 2020
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We present a method for example-based texturing of triangular 3D meshes. Our algorithm maps a small 2D texture sample onto objects of arbitrary size in a seamless fashion, with no visible repetitions and low overall distortion. It requires minimal user interaction and can be applied to complex, multi-layered input materials that are not required to be tileable. Our framework integrates a patch-based approach with per-pixel compositing. To minimize visual artifacts, we run a three-level optimization that starts with a rigid alignment of texture patches (macro scale), then continues with non-rigid adjustments (meso scale) and finally performs pixel-level texture blending (micro scale). We demonstrate that the relevance of the three levels depends on the texture content and type (stochastic, structured, or anisotropic textures).

» Show BibTeX

@article{schuster2020,
author = {Schuster, Kersten and Trettner, Philip and Schmitz, Patric and Kobbelt, Leif},
title = {A Three-Level Approach to Texture Mapping and Synthesis on 3D Surfaces},
year = {2020},
issue_date = {Apr 2020},
publisher = {The Association for Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching},
address = {USA},
volume = {3},
number = {1},
url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3384542},
doi = {10.1145/3384542},
journal = {Proc. ACM Comput. Graph. Interact. Tech.},
month = apr,
articleno = {1},
numpages = {19},
keywords = {material blending, surface texture synthesis, texture mapping}
}





You Spin my Head Right Round: Threshold of Limited Immersion for Rotation Gains in Redirected Walking


Patric Schmitz, Julian Romeo Hildebrandt, André Calero Valdez, Leif Kobbelt, Martina Ziefle
IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics
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In virtual environments, the space that can be explored by real walking is limited by the size of the tracked area. To enable unimpeded walking through large virtual spaces in small real-world surroundings, redirection techniques are used. These unnoticeably manipulate the user’s virtual walking trajectory. It is important to know how strongly such techniques can be applied without the user noticing the manipulation—or getting cybersick. Previously, this was estimated by measuring a detection threshold (DT) in highly-controlled psychophysical studies, which experimentally isolate the effect but do not aim for perceived immersion in the context of VR applications. While these studies suggest that only relatively low degrees of manipulation are tolerable, we claim that, besides establishing detection thresholds, it is important to know when the user’s immersion breaks. We hypothesize that the degree of unnoticed manipulation is significantly different from the detection threshold when the user is immersed in a task. We conducted three studies: a) to devise an experimental paradigm to measure the threshold of limited immersion (TLI), b) to measure the TLI for slowly decreasing and increasing rotation gains, and c) to establish a baseline of cybersickness for our experimental setup. For rotation gains greater than 1.0, we found that immersion breaks quite late after the gain is detectable. However, for gains lesser than 1.0, some users reported a break of immersion even before established detection thresholds were reached. Apparently, the developed metric measures an additional quality of user experience. This article contributes to the development of effective spatial compression methods by utilizing the break of immersion as a benchmark for redirection techniques.




Fluid Sketching — Immersive Sketching Based on Fluid Flow


Sevinc Eroglu, Sascha Gebhardt, Patric Schmitz, Dominik Rausch, Torsten Wolfgang Kuhlen
Proceedings of IEEE Virtual Reality 2018
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Fluid artwork refers to works of art based on the aesthetics of fluid motion, such as smoke photography, ink injection into water, and paper marbling. Inspired by such types of art, we created Fluid Sketching as a novel medium for creating 3D fluid artwork in immersive virtual environments. It allows artists to draw 3D fluid-like sketches and manipulate them via six degrees of freedom input devices. Different sets of brush strokes are available, varying different characteristics of the fluid. Because of fluid's nature, the diffusion of the drawn fluid sketch is animated, and artists have control over altering the fluid properties and stopping the diffusion process whenever they are satisfied with the current result. Furthermore, they can shape the drawn sketch by directly interacting with it, either with their hand or by blowing into the fluid. We rely on particle advection via curl-noise as a fast procedural method for animating the fluid flow.

» Show Videos
» Show BibTeX

@InProceedings{Eroglu2018,
author = {Eroglu, Sevinc and Gebhardt, Sascha and Schmitz, Patric and Rausch, Dominik and Kuhlen, Torsten Wolfgang},
title = {{Fluid Sketching — Immersive Sketching Based on Fluid Flow}},
booktitle = {Proceedings of IEEE Virtual Reality Conference 2018},
year = {2018}
}





Get Well Soon! Human Factors’ Influence on Cybersickness after Redirected Walking Exposure in Virtual Reality


Julian Romeo Hildebrandt, Patric Schmitz, André Calero Valdez, Leif Kobbelt, Martina Ziefle
Proceedings of HCI International 2018
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Cybersickness poses a crucial threat to applications in the domain of Virtual Reality. Yet, its predictors are insufficiently explored when redirection techniques are applied. Those techniques let users explore large virtual spaces by natural walking in a smaller tracked space. This is achieved by unnoticeably manipulating the user’s virtual walking trajectory. Unfortunately, this also makes the application more prone to cause Cybersickness. We conducted a user study with a semi-structured interview to get quantitative and qualitative insights into this domain. Results show that Cybersickness arises, but also eases ten minutes after the exposure. Quantitative results indicate that a tolerance towards Cybersickness might be related to self-efficacy constructs and therefore learnable or trainable, while qualitative results indicate that users’ endurance of Cybersickness is dependent on symptom factors such as intensity and duration, as well as factors of usage context and motivation. The role of Cybersickness in Virtual Reality environments is discussed in terms of the applicability of redirected walking techniques.



Real Walking in Virtual Spaces: Visiting the Aachen Cathedral


Patric Schmitz, Leif Kobbelt
Mensch und Computer 2018 - Workshopband
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Real walking is the most natural and intuitive way to navigate the world around us. In Virtual Reality, the limited tracking area of commercially available systems typically does not match the size of the virtual environment we wish to explore. Spatial compression methods enable the user to walk further in the virtual environment than the real tracking bounds permit. This demo gives a glimpse into our ongoing research on spatial compression in VR. Visitors can walk through a realistic model of the Aachen Cathedral within a room-sized tracking area.

» Show Videos
» Show BibTeX

@article{schmitz2018real,
title={Real Walking in Virtual Spaces: Visiting the Aachen Cathedral},
author={Schmitz, Patric and Kobbelt, Leif},
journal={Mensch und Computer 2018-Workshopband},
year={2018},
publisher={Gesellschaft f{\"u}r Informatik eV}
}





Vista Widgets: A Framework for Designing 3D User Interfaces from Reusable Interaction Building Blocks


Sascha Gebhardt, Till Petersen-Krauß, B. Sc., Sebastian Pick, Dominik Rausch, Christian Nowke, Thomas Knott, Patric Schmitz, Daniel Zielasko, Bernd Hentschel, Torsten Wolfgang Kuhlen
Proceedings of the 22nd ACM Conference on Virtual Reality Software and Technology (VRST)
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Virtual Reality (VR) has been an active field of research for several decades, with 3D interaction and 3D User Interfaces (UIs) as important sub-disciplines. However, the development of 3D interaction techniques and in particular combining several of them to construct complex and usable 3D UIs remains challenging, especially in a VR context. In addition, there is currently only limited reusable software for implementing such techniques in comparison to traditional 2D UIs. To overcome this issue, we present ViSTA Widgets, a software framework for creating 3D UIs for immersive virtual environments. It extends the ViSTA VR framework by providing functionality to create multi-device, multi-focus-strategy interaction building blocks and means to easily combine them into complex 3D UIs. This is realized by introducing a device abstraction layer along sophisticated focus management and functionality to create novel 3D interaction techniques and 3D widgets. We present the framework and illustrate its effectiveness with code and application examples accompanied by performance evaluations.

» Show BibTeX

@InProceedings{Gebhardt2016,
Title = {{Vista Widgets: A Framework for Designing 3D User Interfaces from Reusable Interaction Building Blocks}},
Author = {Gebhardt, Sascha and Petersen-Krau, Till and Pick, Sebastian and Rausch, Dominik and Nowke, Christian and Knott, Thomas and Schmitz, Patric and Zielasko, Daniel and Hentschel, Bernd and Kuhlen, Torsten W.},
Booktitle = {Proceedings of the 22nd ACM Conference on Virtual Reality Software and Technology},
Year = {2016},
Address = {New York, NY, USA},
Pages = {251--260},
Publisher = {ACM},
Series = {VRST '16},
Acmid = {2993382},
Doi = {10.1145/2993369.2993382},
ISBN = {978-1-4503-4491-3},
Keywords = {3D interaction, 3D user interfaces, framework, multi-device, virtual reality},
Location = {Munich, Germany},
Numpages = {10},
Url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2993369.2993382}
}





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